In the news

16 January

15 January

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In the news

Reuters: Germany backs U.S. nominee Kim for second term as World Bank president
The Star: Uhuru endorses World Bank President Jim Yong Kim for second term
All Africa: Rwanda and Benin Welcome Nomination of Dr. Kim for Second Term At the World Bank
Center for Global Development: Five Women Who Could Lead the World Bank
The Tribune: US nominates Jim Yong as World Bank chief for 2nd term
Government of the Netherlands: Netherlands supports second term for World Bank President Kim
Devex: Donald Trump won’t choose the next World Bank president
The New York Times: World Bank President Jim Yong Kim Is Nominated for a Second Term
The Wall Street Journal: Obama Administration Moves to Secure New Term for World Bank Chief Jim Yong Kim
U.S. Department of the Treasury: U.S. Nominates Dr. Jim Yong Kim to Lead World Bank for Second Term
Devex: Jim Kim to seek 2nd term at the World Bank
Public Finance International: World Bank rules out change to leadership selection process
Tempo: World Bank Begins President Selection Process
Financial Times: World Bank clears way for Kim’s second term
World Bank: World Bank Board Launches Presidential Selection Process
Center for Global Development: Excuse me, World Bank, This Time Is Last Time’s Next
Financial Times: World Bank staff challenge Jim Yong Kim’s second term

With Ngozi appearances deceive

Patrick Bond’s three part essay on the race for the presidency for the World Bank, published below, contains a long section on Ngozi. It is in part three and is well worth a read, as it one of the few times we have seen the Nigerain finance ministers record called seriously into question. Ngozi has been the subject of countless fawning op-eds from the commentariat in Washington and Europe, with very little analysis of her tenure at the Bank or in the Nigerian government. It seems strange that an elected official, nominated for such an important position, should not receive more scrutiny. She has run a smooth PR campaign thus far, and it seems journalists have exercised their energy on Kim, with little critical fuel left in the tank for Ngozi. Continue reading

Promise-breaking at the World Bank, Part 3: Contenders

It is onto the terrain of unprecedented global financial malgovernance that Kim now strides. To be sure, on the way, he’s being tripped up a little by disgruntled neoliberals like Reuters columnist Felix Salmon, who concludes, correctly, “the US government in general, and the Geithner-Clinton axis in particular, doesn’t actually want any real change at the World Bank. Change can only come from a strong president who is strongly supported by Continue reading